Personal Bankruptcy: Do I Have Any Choices?

Personal Bankruptcy: Do I Have Any Choices?

Finding information about filing personal bankruptcy does not have to be difficult. There are things to do and things to avoid doing just before and following filing bankruptcy. The following article is full of information that may help you know what to do and what not to do around the time of filing bankruptcy.

Watch your lawyer fill out your paperwork carefully. They, most likely, have multiple cases going on at the same time and may not be able to keep up with every detail of your case. Be sure to carefully read all of that paperwork, in order to make sure that everything is filled out correctly.

Make sure you have a solid understanding of which debts can be eliminated by bankruptcy, and which ones cannot. Debts like student loans, child support or alimony payments, and taxes, are generally not discharged through bankruptcy. Bankruptcy can help if your wages are being garnished or if you have large unsecured debts, like, credit cards and utility bills.

Ask friends and family for moral support. They may not be able to lend you money, but you should be able to tell them about your hardships and to lean on them. It can be hard to talk about money with the people close to you. You will likely find that they are much more supportive than you expect.

Consider filing Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7, if you are facing foreclosure. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to create a restructured payment plan which includes your mortgage arrears. This will allow you to get your mortgage payments current, so that you won’t lose your home. Chapter 13 doesn’t require you to turn over property, so you don’t have to worry about the homestead exemption, either.

Bankruptcy laws vary from state to state. Play it safe and hire an attorney that works in your own state to be sure that the correct laws are followed. Some lawyers are better than others, so be sure to select one that is qualified to handle your case. It could make a big difference in how smoothly things go and the end result.

It is important to know how Chapter 7 filings differ from Chapter 13 filings. Research both types of bankruptcy online, and weigh the positives and negatives each would offer you. Before making any decisions, discuss the information you have learned with your lawyer.

Many times, when a debtor files for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, their home can be protected. This is because of the homestead exemption. This exemption can protect the home, if the debtor owes below a certain threshold. Laws concerning this exemption do vary between states. Be sure to consult with a bankruptcy attorney before, assuming your home is safe from liquidation.

Fight the temptation to rack up large credit card balances just before filing. The creditor will take a look at your account history. If they determine that you charged a lot before applying for bankruptcy, they can file a request with the court to hold you responsible for the amount that you charged.

Once you have completed the bankruptcy filing, you should take time to do something you enjoy. Many people who undergo this process become way too stressed out. This stress could actually cause depression, if you don’t combat it. Once the process is complete your life will improve.

Talk with your lawyer about getting lower payments for any car you wish to keep. A lot of the time, your payments may be lowered due to Chapter 7 bankruptcy. There are a few requirements that you have to meet to be eligible, though. You have to have bought the car more than 2.5 years ago, your loan’s interest rate needs to be over a certain amount, and your employment history has to be good.

Be weary of creditors once you have filed for bankruptcy. These companies think because you have filed for bankruptcy, you cannot file it again for a long time. You are not risky to lend to. By accepting loans from these companies, you are putting yourself at risk for more financial turmoil.

A good personal bankruptcy tip is to be well versed in all of the rules when it comes to filing for bankruptcy. The last thing you would want is to be penalized, or taxed by the IRS. They do indeed tax some of the debt that you’ve managed to get rid of.

Make sure to comply with the educational requirements for bankruptcy. You have to meet with an approved credit counselor within the six months before you file. You have to take an approved financial management course. If you don’t take these courses in time, the court will dismiss your bankruptcy.

You should now be better prepared for the time before, during and after bankruptcy. The information that has been provided to you has been known to help many other debtors in the same situation that you are in. Use it to your benefit and make the right choices with such a big life choice.